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African Friends and Money Matters grew out of frustrations that Westerners experience when they travel and work in Africa. Africans have just as many frustrations relating to Westerners in their midst. Each manages money, time, and relationships in very different ways, often creating friction and misunderstanding. This book deals with everyday life in Africa, showing the underlying logic of African economic systems and behavior. Two new chapters in this second edition emphasize personal relationships, making the book even more relevant to the thoughtful reader. Maranz introduces these principles, as well as the very different goals of African and Western economic systems, plus ninety specific observations of money-related African behaviors. Personal anecdotes bring this book to life. The result is that the reader can make sense of customs that at first seem incomprehensible. This popular book has captured the interest of Westerners living in or visiting Sub-Saharan Africa: business, diplomatic, and NGO personnel; religious workers, journalists, and tourists. The readership includes professors and students of African Studies. African readers will also be interested for what it reveals about Western culture and ways Westerners often react to Africa. David E. Maranz (Ph.D., International Development) has worked with SIL International in several African countries since 1975 in community development, administration, and anthropology consulting. His earlier book, Peace is Everything (SIL International), examines the worldview and religious context of the Senegambia region.

African Friends and Money Matters grew out of frustrations that Westerners experience when they travel and work in Africa. Africans have just as many frustrations relating to Westerners in their midst. Each manages money, time, and relationships in very different ways, often creating friction and misunderstanding. This book deals with everyday life in Africa, showing the underlying logic of African economic systems and behavior. Two new chapters in this second edition emphasize personal relationships, making the book even more relevant to the thoughtful reader. Maranz introduces these principles, as well as the very different goals of African and Western economic systems, plus ninety specific observations of money-related African behaviors. Personal anecdotes bring this book to life. The result is that the reader can make sense of customs that at first seem incomprehensible. This popular book has captured the interest of Westerners living in or visiting Sub-Saharan Africa: business, diplomatic, and NGO personnel; religious workers, journalists, and tourists. The readership includes professors and students of African Studies. African readers will also be interested for what it reveals about Western culture and ways Westerners often react to Africa. David E. Maranz (Ph.D., International Development) has worked with SIL International in several African countries since 1975 in community development, administration, and anthropology consulting. His earlier book, Peace is Everything (SIL International), examines the worldview and religious context of the Senegambia region.

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African Friends and Money Matters grew out of frustrations that Westerners experience when they travel and work in Africa. Africans have just as many frustrations relating to Westerners in their midst. Each manages money, time, and relationships in very different ways, often creating friction and misunderstanding. This book deals with everyday life in Africa, showing the underlying logic of African economic systems and behavior. Two new chapters in this second edition emphasize personal relationships, making the book even more relevant to the thoughtful reader. Maranz introduces these principles, as well as the very different goals of African and Western economic systems, plus ninety specific observations of money-related African behaviors. Personal anecdotes bring this book to life. The result is that the reader can make sense of customs that at first seem incomprehensible. This popular book has captured the interest of Westerners living in or visiting Sub-Saharan Africa: business, diplomatic, and NGO personnel; religious workers, journalists, and tourists. The readership includes professors and students of African Studies. African readers will also be interested for what it reveals about Western culture and ways Westerners often react to Africa. David E. Maranz (Ph.D., International Development) has worked with SIL International in several African countries since 1975 in community development, administration, and anthropology consulting. His earlier book, Peace is Everything (SIL International), examines the worldview and religious context of the Senegambia region.